LGBT Hate Crime the Figures

Over the past 25 years, Britain has taken huge strides on the journey to equality for lesbian, gay, bi and trans (LGBT) people. Changes in the law mean that more schools, employers and public services are tackling anti-LGBT discrimination and bullying. Equal marriage is now a reality for many, and Section 28 has been consigned to history. But for many LGBT people, these legal changes have not translated into true equality, and for trans people in particular, there is still much progress to be made before they are fully protected and equal under the law. In this first report of a series on what it means to be LGBT in Britain today, we focus on the prevalence and impact of hate crime and the discrimination many LGBT people face in their everyday lives.

It’s become a sad fact but…

One in ten LGBT people have experienced homophobic, biphobic or transphobic abuse online directed towards them personally in the last month. This number increases to one in four for trans people directly experiencing transphobic abuse online in the last month.

One in five LGBT people have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the last 12 months.

More than a third of LGBT people say they don’t feel comfortable walking down the street while holding their partner’s hand. This increases to three in five gay men.

Two in five trans people have experienced a hate crime or incident because of their gender identity in the last 12 months and one in six LGB people, who aren’t trans, have experienced a hate crime or incident due to their sexual orientation in the same period.